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FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 21, 2007

For further information: info@cgeology.com

COMPUTATIONAL GEOLOGY'S PRESIDENT DESCRIBES A SIGNIFICANT RE-INTERPRETATION OF THE STEEP FLANK OF THE QARUN "A" LOBE, WESTERN DESERT, EGYPT, AT THE NOVEMBER 2007 AAPG MEETING IN ATHENS, GREECE.

November 21, 2008 --Jim Morse, Computational Geology's President, presented a paper at the November 2007 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in Athens, Greece. In the paper, Morse described a significant re-interpretation of the steep flank of the Qarun "A" Lobe, a 100 MMBO (OOIP) field in the Western Desert, Egypt. The re-interpretation was based on Geodes analysis and re-processing of the dipmeter data from the A-17, a key well on the steep flank of this asymmetric anticline.

Based on the original processing of the A-17 dipmeter data, previous interpreters had inferrred that the dip below 8565' MD was approximately 35 degrees. Our Geodes analysis indicated that:

  1. The search angle used in the original processing had been set too low,
  2. The computed dips below 8565' were false data points,
  3. The dip below 8565' most likely is much greater than 35 degrees, and, therefore,
  4. The dipmeter curves needed to be re-processed using a higher search angle.

A search angle of 35 degrees had been used in the original processing. For the re-processing, a search angle of 80 degrees was used. Geodes analysis of the re-processed data shows that the dips below 8565' are between 50 and 70 degrees, not 35 degrees.

"The implications of our re-interpretation of the A-17 dipmeter are clear", said Morse. "Even though much modern 'dipmeter' data have been picked (correlated) from images by hand and thus do not suffer from search-angle problems, there are thousands of wells with dipmeter and imager data that have been picked by machine. Some of these wells, like the A-17, may have been processed with search angles that were too low. A careful examination of each one of these machine-picked logs will lead to at least some re-interpretations. These, in turn, could (1) prevent the drilling of unnecessary dry holes and (2) lead to new discoveries and/or improved reservoir management."

Also see Re-Interpretation of the North Flank of Qarun "A" Field (Western Desert, Egypt), Based on SCAT Analysis and Reprocessing of the A-17 Dipmeter.

Computational Geology is a U. S.-based provider of specialty geological software and interpretation services. Current products and services focus on 3D analysis and interpretation of dip data using advanced techniques, including SCAT and isogon-based cross sections.

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